Dogs Traveling Across the Country vs. Pet Sitter

I have been on a vacation and have been traveling across the country. It is nice to see people traveling with their dogs, but I see so many difficulties and worries doing so. Many hotels and motels allow pets now, but have a non-refundable deposit. It’s hard to know what the weather will be like as well – we went from 50 degrees in Missouri to 29 degree in Denver, Colorado and having to detour because of snow and closing of I-70 at Vail Pass. Then we go through Utah and Nevada into California. I saw dogs in cars barking desperately with anxiety that they were left in the car. And I here in Oregon it has been almost 70 degrees in the day and dogs are left in cars with the windows up. It is proven that 70 degree weather can raise a car’s temperature to almost 100 degrees – it can be lethal. I miss my dogs so much while I am gone, but I have good pet sitters (my own sub contractor and my parents) and I know they are so much more comfortable having a pet sitter come by while they are staying at their own home with their own pillows and food and bowls. They are getting lots of attention and love from the pet sitter, and I don’t have to worry about what I am going to do with my furbabies if I want to hike on a no pets trail or eat at a nice restaurant that may take an hour. I have enjoyed seeing others pets and giving them some love...

Dogs Naturally Want to Comfort People Who are Upset

from Dogheirs.com Dogs want to give comfort to people when they are upset. It seems like a fact dog lovers have known for a very long time, and now a new study backs them up. Scientists at the University of London conducted a study that revealed dogs truly do respond to human tears and will naturally try and reassure a distressed person. It also turns out dogs will try and comfort anyone who cries, not just their owner. Researchers filmed 18 dogs of various breeds at the homes of their owner. One of the researchers ignored the dog and started to either talk, hum loudly or pretend to cry. Fifteen of the dogs stopped what they were doing and went over to the crying person and displayed submissive behavior when approaching. “The dogs approached whoever was crying regardless of their identity…they were responding to the person’s emotion, not their own needs, which is suggestive of empathic-like comfort-offering behavior,” Jennifer Mayer, one of the authors of the study, said. The youngest dog in the experiment was an 8-month old Labrador Retriever. As soon as the puppy heard Mayer pretend to cry, he rushed up and put his paws on her shoulder. “Crying carried greater emotional meaning for the dogs and provoked a stronger overall response than either humming or talking,” said Mayer. “Regardless of whether it was their owner or the stranger, when an individual cried most of the dogs went up to them in a quiet, submissive way suggesting comfort-giving.” The dogs also went directly up to the stranger and did not seek to be comforted themselves. This dog...

Pets are Family – Even for your Pet Sitter

Last year toward the end of summer, a client of mine moved due to a shift in his job. Unfortunately, the move was out of my service area and too far to drive. I took care of his two Pugs and his cat 5 days a week. Boopadoo was a young, rambunctious Pug who was full of energy and loved to just run and run. She helped me lose weight as I ran with her around the apartment complex. Cody was a very old Pug who just liked to get out to potty and smell the fresh air and walk a bit in the grass. Kitty was an older cat, but loved to be petted and enjoyed getting her little treat each day. I realized the very first week or so how much I missed them. Today, though, at a Joplin Area Chamber of Commerce First Friday Coffee, I saw my client and we talked about the Pugs and Kitty. Boo now has a yard that she just loves and runs around like crazy. She helps Cody stay in this life as she keeps her on her toes, annoying and playing with her. As we talked, I realized how much these three had become a part of my life for the almost 7 months I took care of them and all their needs. I know my new contractor, Gen, has stayed much longer than the usual allotted time a few mornings for a couple of dogs we watched because they were in a crate all the time. She just wanted them to have fun and run and stretch. I...

Senior Dogs – In Home Pet Sitting

This article from Healthy Living at Pedigree convinces me more and more that in-home pet care is the best way to go for any pet, especially your senior pet. Just think of the time you could save if you did not have to go through all the work of finding the perfect kennel for your senior pet. They are already used to their own home and you have most likely made sure they are comfortable and there are no obstacles or hard to navigate areas.   Definitely consider in-home pet sitting to kenneling your pets, especially those who used to their long known “Creature Comforts!” Senior Friendly Kennels  (from Pedigree’s Healthy Living newsletter) http://www.pedigree.com/all-things-dog/article-library/Senior-Friendly-Kennels.aspx Whew, what a lot of work!  Our staff at Creature Comforts are very conscientious and take the care of the pets in our charge very seriously. Their comfort, physical and mental nourishment are our key goal. Call us at 417-529-6750 to schedule for an in-home pet sitter for the next time you go out of town. — Marcia Kay Foster Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new...

Why Dogs Bite and How They Warn us

From a great article from Doggone Safe at http://www.doggonesafe.com/why_dogs_bite Why do dogs bite? There are several possible reasons why a dog may bite a child: The dog is protecting a possession, food or water dish or puppies. The dog is protecting a resting place. The dog is protecting its owner or the owner’s property. The the child has done something to provoke or frighten the dog (e.g., hugging the dog, moving into the dog’s space, leaning or stepping over the dog, trying to take something from the dog). The dog is old and grumpy and having a bad day and has no patience for the actions of a child. The dog is injured or sick. The child has hurt or startled it by stepping on it, poking it or pulling its fur, tail or ears. The dog has not learned bite inhibition and bites hard by accident when the child offers food or a toy to the dog. The child and dog are engaging in rough play and the dog gets overly excited. The dog views the child as a prey item because the child is running and/or screaming near the dog or riding a bicycle or otherwise moving past the dog. The dog is of a herding breed and nips while trying to “herd” the children. How do they warn us? There are always warning signs before a bite occurs, but these can be very subtle and may be missed by many people. A dog may appear to tolerate being repeatedly mauled by a child and one day bites, surprising everyone. Sometimes the warning have gone on for...