HEATSTROKE AND DOGS: Know the Symptoms

HEATSTROKE AND DOGS: Know the Symptoms

by Jessica Peralta in DogsNaturally.com You’re walking along with your 80-pound, long-haired shepherd one warm, sunny afternoon. You’re breaking a bit of a sweat, but you feel just fine in your shorts and tank. But then you look over at Thor, and he’s not looking too good … his eyes are glazed, he’s panting heavily and he’s starting to pull back on the leash. “But, it’s not that hot,” you say to yourself. “What is up with Thor?” Thor is probably on his way to having heatstroke, which means he is quickly losing his ability to regulate his body temperature because of an overabundance of heat. Dogs don’t sweat the way we do – they only have sweat glands in their nose and pads of their feet. And their only real recourse when they are overheating is to pant, which sometimes isn’t enough. Add to that the fact that their bodies are covered in fur and their paws are usually in direct contact with hot concrete or asphalt … and well, it’s easy to see how they can get much hotter than we can – fast. And since heatstroke can quickly lead to irreversible damage to major organs like the kidneys, liver, heart, brain – and can even cause death – it’s important to know the signs. How Do I Know If My Dog Has Heatstroke? Normally, a dog’s body temperature is somewhere between 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit, slightly higher than for humans. A dog will start to experience heatstroke at over 105 degrees. At around 106 to 108 degrees, organ damage can occur. Always keep a rectal thermometer handy...
Foods That are GOOD For Dogs

Foods That are GOOD For Dogs

So, you have probably seen dozens and dozens of posts of what NOT to give to your dog or to be aware of while you are cooking. Wouldn't it be nice to hear some positive news, like what is OKAY for your dog to eat?  I have listed below 10 things that your dog can eat safely (and just may be good for them, too)! 1.  Apple slices (no cores) - This provides antioxidants and boosts immunity. 2.  Spinach - Increases iron, anti inflammatory, contains calcium and anti-cancer properties. 3.  Pumpkin (baked or canned) - aids in problematic digestion, and helps constipation and diarrhea. 4.  Green Beans - vitamins, high in fiber and a low calorie filler (snacks in between meals). 5.  Watermelon - Antioxidants, lycopene, nutrients, helps hydration on hog days. 6.  Cantaloupe - easy to digest, a vitamin punch, beta carotene, may help reduce and prevent growth of cataracts. 7.  Carrots - filling teats for overweight dogs on diets, good for oral hygiene, use to help with "chewers." 8.  Blueberries - anti-oxidants, occasional rare treat. 9.  Pears - Good for cardio and high in dietary fiber. 10. Sweet Potatoes - increase in amino acids, good for muscles, has antioxidant properties. There you have it ... 10 foods that are GOOD for your dog, and most likely, they will like them. I really depends on the dog. You will find treats made with these foods as well.Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new...
Why Does My Dog Eat Poop?

Why Does My Dog Eat Poop?

By: Dr. Donna Spector Copraphagia (poop eating) is usually a nasty learned habit and not a medical problem. Here are the top reasons why dogs eat poop and what you can do to curb their appetite! 1. Oral fixation habit—puppies (like human children) go through a phase where they put anything and everything in their mouths in order to investigate. Unfortunately, this often includes feces. As dogs mature, usually this habit goes away…but not always.Vet Tip: encourage oral investigation of toys and other objects. Do not punish or give excessive attention if your puppy does eat feces—this will just reinforce the behavior. 2. Allelomimetic behavior—this is the fancy name for learned behavior. If your dog watches you pick up poop, he can learn to do the same. If his beloved master is doing it, why shouldn't he…?Vet Tip: Clean the poop out of the yard when your dog is not around! 3. Attention getting behavior—many dog owners get very upset when their dog eats poop…which means he is getting the attention he desires. Although it is negative attention, it is attention nonetheless.Vet Tip: Try not to react so negatively when you know your dog has been snacking on his poo. Pretty soon it will lose its novelty and without your attention, many times they drop the behavior. 4. Housekeeping—dogs that are crated, kenneled, or even kept in one room within the house will learn to function as their own housekeeper. In other words, if they poop in their space, they will "clean up" the only way they know how! Vet Tip: Clean any feces up immediately. If your dog is crated throughout...
Prevention Of Heat Exhaustion in Dogs

Prevention Of Heat Exhaustion in Dogs

Great info from StrongDogz.com Summers always brings to mind things like vacations, picnics, boating on lakes and rivers, and children playing in the sun and swimming in the pool or at beaches. Many times the family dog is right there with them totally engaged in the activities. There is fun to be had for sure but there is also a lurking danger. Heat exhaustion! Dogs love to get caught up with us in our summer fun. They live for these social activities and your companionship. Many times though they get so caught up that they surpass their own bodies ability to cool off and go into distress from heat exhaustion. At this time their bodies overheat past their capacity to cool themselves by panting. If this is let go unattended they can go from heat exhaustion to heat stroke, which could be deadly. Recognizing the signs of heat exhaustion in your dog is critical to his well being. When a dog is suffering heat exhaustion the first thing that you will notice is his tongue hanging out of his mouth to an unusual degree. His need to try to gasp for air and cool himself will cause his lips to pull back and expose his back molars. He will start to exhibit signs of stress which may show itself in pacing, circling, laying down and then getting right back up again, or a glazed over look in his eyes that denotes panic. He is panicking because his body is telling him that his temperature is rapidly rising to a point that he cannot cool himself. You should always have...

5 Tips on How to Stop a Dog From Pawing

By Mikkel Becker | Vetstreet.com | March 28, 2014 Pawing and scratching is a tactic dogs use to garner attention, ask for something they want, or as part of play. My parents have a 12-pound Pomeranian mix named Quixote who is the pleasure pig of all canines. Despite his small size, he takes on a demanding role when it comes to tickle time. He uses his claws to scratch a leg or foot until someone uses that foot to scratch him back. If he wants to be tickled on his tummy, he curls his paw around an arm like a hook and drags that arm toward his belly. My mom calls Quixote "the Velveteen Rabbit" because she claims he's been rubbed so much, his hair is going to fall off. Despite my efforts to help Mom nix her dog's bad habit, she takes on the responsibility of part-time masseuse for her canine without complaint, and proudly wears the tic-tac-toe marks from Quixote's claws on her skin. But there's reason to discourage such behavior. Pawing and clawing of hands for attention can move beyond a nuisance and become a serious problem, especially as the size of the dog increases. Pawing can cause severe skin injuries, especially to those most vulnerable, like young children and the elderly, and a large pawing dog can trip someone or knock her over. The behavior can be improved with training, in particular by replacing the scratching with preferable alternatives. Here are my go-to ways to stop pawing that work with pint-sized to pony-sized canines: 1. Train an alternative Pawing is often used to get a...